Events & News

The site for the Sojourner Truth memorial statue was a former small city park at the corner of Pine & Park Streets in Florence. The city donated the site for the statue and final plans were approved by the Northampton Board of Public Works in November 2001

Rutgers to Name Apartment Building after Sojourner Truth

In February 2017 Rutgers University announced that it will name an apartment building on its historic New Brunswick campus after the abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth (c.1797-1883). The decision followed research findings, published in Scarlet and Black: Slavery and Dispossession in Rutgers History, that Sojourner Truth had been enslaved as a child to members of the family of Rutgers’ first president Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh (1736–1790). However,  Sojourner Truth–who was born with the name Isabella–never lived in New Jersey but grew up in Ulster County, New York. She was born enslaved to Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh’s brother, Johannes Hardenbergh Jr. (1729-1799), after whose death she and her family became the property of his son Charles. Johannes Jr. has been confused with his father, Colonel Johannes Hardenbergh (1706-1786), a founding trustee of Queens (later Rutgers) College. Not only did they share a name and lived in Hurley, near Kingston.

The Sojourner Truth Memorial Committee is a 501(c)3 organization ("Committee for Northampton, Inc"); EIN 22-3529750.